Martin Prusinkiewicz, PhD


Postdoctoral Fellow, UBC

Rapid Nuclear Exclusion of Hcm1 in Aging Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leads to Vacuolar Alkalization and Replicative Senescence


Journal article


A. Ghavidel, Kunal Baxi, Martin A. Prusinkiewicz, C. Swan, Z. Belak, C. Eskiw, Carlos E. Carvalho, T. Harkness
G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, 2018

Semantic Scholar DOI PubMedCentral PubMed
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APA
Ghavidel, A., Baxi, K., Prusinkiewicz, M. A., Swan, C., Belak, Z., Eskiw, C., … Harkness, T. (2018). Rapid Nuclear Exclusion of Hcm1 in Aging Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leads to Vacuolar Alkalization and Replicative Senescence. G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

Chicago/Turabian
Ghavidel, A., Kunal Baxi, Martin A. Prusinkiewicz, C. Swan, Z. Belak, C. Eskiw, Carlos E. Carvalho, and T. Harkness. “Rapid Nuclear Exclusion of Hcm1 in Aging Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Leads to Vacuolar Alkalization and Replicative Senescence.” G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics (2018).

MLA
Ghavidel, A., et al. “Rapid Nuclear Exclusion of Hcm1 in Aging Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Leads to Vacuolar Alkalization and Replicative Senescence.” G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, 2018.


Abstract

The yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, like other higher eukaryotes, undergo a finite number of cell divisions before exiting the cell cycle due to the effects of aging. Here, we show that yeast aging begins with the nuclear exclusion of Hcm1 in young cells, resulting in loss of acidic vacuoles. Autophagy is required for healthy aging in yeast, with proteins targeted for turnover by autophagy directed to the vacuole. Consistent with this, vacuolar acidity is necessary for vacuolar function and yeast longevity. Using yeast genetics and immunofluorescence microscopy, we confirm that vacuolar acidity plays a critical role in cell health and lifespan, and is potentially maintained by a series of Forkhead Box (Fox) transcription factors. An interconnected transcriptional network involving the Fox proteins (Fkh1, Fkh2 and Hcm1) are required for transcription of v-ATPase subunits and vacuolar acidity. As cells age, Hcm1 is rapidly excluded from the nucleus in young cells, blocking the expression of Hcm1 targets (Fkh1 and Fkh2), leading to loss of v-ATPase gene expression, reduced vacuolar acidification, increased α-syn-GFP vacuolar accumulation, and finally, diminished replicative lifespan (RLS). Loss of vacuolar acidity occurs about the same time as Hcm1 nuclear exclusion and is conserved; we have recently demonstrated that lysosomal alkalization similarly contributes to aging in C. elegans following a transition from progeny producing to post-reproductive life. Our data points to a molecular mechanism regulating vacuolar acidity that signals the end of RLS when acidification is lost.


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