Martin Prusinkiewicz, PhD


Postdoctoral Fellow, UBC

Viral Appropriation: Laying Claim to Host Nuclear Transport Machinery


Journal article


Tanner M. Tessier, Mackenzie J. Dodge, Martin A. Prusinkiewicz, J. Mymryk
Cells, 2019

Semantic Scholar DOI PubMedCentral PubMed
Cite

Cite

APA
Tessier, T. M., Dodge, M. J., Prusinkiewicz, M. A., & Mymryk, J. (2019). Viral Appropriation: Laying Claim to Host Nuclear Transport Machinery. Cells.

Chicago/Turabian
Tessier, Tanner M., Mackenzie J. Dodge, Martin A. Prusinkiewicz, and J. Mymryk. “Viral Appropriation: Laying Claim to Host Nuclear Transport Machinery.” Cells (2019).

MLA
Tessier, Tanner M., et al. “Viral Appropriation: Laying Claim to Host Nuclear Transport Machinery.” Cells, 2019.


Abstract

Protein nuclear transport is an integral process to many cellular pathways and often plays a critical role during viral infection. To overcome the barrier presented by the nuclear membrane and gain access to the nucleus, virally encoded proteins have evolved ways to appropriate components of the nuclear transport machinery. By binding karyopherins, or the nuclear pore complex, viral proteins influence their own transport as well as the transport of key cellular regulatory proteins. This review covers how viral proteins can interact with different components of the nuclear import machinery and how this influences viral replicative cycles. We also highlight the effects that viral perturbation of nuclear transport has on the infected host and how we can exploit viruses as tools to study novel mechanisms of protein nuclear import. Finally, we discuss the possibility that drugs targeting these transport pathways could be repurposed for treating viral infections.


Share